House of Fraser

Overview. This fleet and the Army’s Ports of Embarkation operated throughout the war’s massive logistics in support of the worldwide operations. After the war the Army’s fleet began to resume its peacetime role and even regain the old colors of gray hulls, white deck houses and buff trimming, masts and booms with the red, white and blue stack rings.

Bowyer, and Linda M. Newington , CT

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Private, Company D, st Pennsylvania Infantry. First Lieutenant, Company A, d U. At Honey Hill, S. After several unsuccessful efforts to recover 3 pieces of abandoned artillery, this officer gallantly led a small force fully yards in advance of the Union lines and brought in the guns, preventing their capture. Private, Company G, 21st Ohio Infantry.

One of the 19 of 22 men including 2 civilians who, by direction of Gen. Mitchell or Buell , penetrated nearly miles south into enemy territory and captured a railroad train at Big Shanty, Ga.

At Five Forks, Va. With one companion, voluntarily advanced in a reconnaissance beyond the skirmishers, where he was exposed to imminent peril; also, in the same battle, rode to the front with the commanding general to encourage wavering troops to resume the advance, which they did successfully. Carrying out his duties faithfully during this period, Betham was recommended for gallantry and skill and for his cool courage while under the fire of the enemy throughout these various actions.

Lieutenant Colonel, 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry. With a force of but 75 men, while on a scouting expedition, by a judicious disposition of his men, surprised and captured an entire battalion of the enemy's cavalry. After his command had been forced to fall back, remained alone on the line of battle, caring for his wounded comrades and carrying one of them to a place of safety.

Bibber served on board the U. Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher 23 December The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore.

Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the forts. Hartland, Niagara County, N. Captain of the Top, U. Acting as the first loader of the pivot gun during this bitter engagement Bickford exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by his divisional officer. Corporal, Company G, 8th Missouri Infantry.

Trivolia, Peoria County, Ill. Private, Company D, 4th Missouri Cavalry. At Ivy Farm, Miss. Voluntarily risked his life by taking a horse, under heavy fire, beyond the line of battle for the rescue of his captain, whose horse had been killed in a charge and who was surrounded by the enemy's skirmishers.

Ticonderoga during the attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December , and 13 to 15 January Despite heavy return fire by the enemy and the explosion of the pounder Parrott rifle which killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, Sergeant.

Binder, as captain of a gun, performed his duties with skill and courage during the first 2 days of battle. As his ship again took position on the 13th, he remained steadfast as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns.

During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels. Captain, Company G, th Pennsylvania Infantry. Rallied and led into action a portion of the troops who had given way under the fierce assaults of the enemy.

Sergeant, Company B, 3d Iowa Cavalry. Keokuk, Lee County, Iowa. Private, Company C, 57th Pennsylvania Infantry. Lieutenant Colonel, 37th Illinois Infantry.

At Prairie Grove, Ark. Gallantly charged the position of the enemy at the head of his regiment, after 2 other regiments had been repulsed and driven down the hill, and captured a battery; was severely wounded. Captain, Company K, 37th Illinois Infantry. At Pea Ridge, Ark. Single-handedly confronted the enemy, firing a rifle at them and thus checking their advance within yards of the lines. At a critical stage of the battle, without orders, led a successful advance upon the enemy.

Surgeon, 48th Pennsylvania Infantry. Removed severely wounded officers and soldiers from the field while under a heavy fire from the enemy, exposing himself beyond the call of duty, thus furnishing an example of most distinguished gallantry. Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August Stationed in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells, Blagheen remained steadfast at his post and performed his duties in the powder division throughout the furious action which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Carrying out his duties faithfully throughout this period, Blair was recommended for gallantry and skill and for his cool courage while under the fire of the enemy throughout these actions.

Serving the rifle gun, Blake, an escaped slave, carried out his duties bravely throughout the engagement which resulted in the enemy's abandonment of positions, leaving a caisson and one gun behind.

Private, Company H, 83d Indiana Infantry. Corporal, Company E, th Ohio Infantry. While in command of the provost guard in the village, he saw the Union lines returning before the attack of a greatly superior force of the enemy, mustered his guard, and, without orders, joined in the defense and charged the enemy without support.

He received three saber wounds, his horse was shot, and he was taken prisoner. Colonel, 7th Rhode Island Infantry. This officer, to encourage his regimen; which had never before been in action, and which had been ordered to lie down to protect itself from the enemy's fire, arose to his feet, advanced in front of the line, and himself fired several shots at the enemy at short range, being fully exposed to their fire at the time.

With a single orderly, captured an armed picket of 8 men and marched them in prisoners. Corporal, Company H, th Pennsylvania Infantry. Planted first national colors on the fortifications. At Cedar Creek, Va. Chatham, Four Corners, N.

Voluntarily led a charge across a narrow bridge over the creek, against the lines of the enemy. At Dinwiddie Courthouse, Va. While acting as aide to General Custer, took a flag from the hands of color bearer, rode in front of a line that was being driven back and, under a heavy fire, rallied the men, re-formed the line, and repulsed the charge.

Served as quartermaster on board the U. Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking, 27 May Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati, amidst an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last, though so penetrated by enemy shellfire that her fate was sealed.

Conspicuously cool in making signals throughout the battle, Bois, after all the Cincinnati's staffs had been shot away, succeeded in nailing the flag to the stump of the forestaff to enable this proud ship to go down, "with her colors nailed to the mast.

Carrying out his duties courageously, Bond exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by his divisional officer. Lieutenant, Company G, 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry. As 1 of the first of Devin's Division to enter the works, he fought in a hand-to-hand struggle with a Confederate to capture his flag by superior physical strength.

At Boydton Plank Road, Va. Checked the rout and rallied the troops of his command in the face of a terrible fire of musketry; was severely wounded. This soldier, at Williamsburg, Va.

A year later, at Chancellorsville, voluntarily, and at great personal risk, brought from the field of battle and saved the life of Capt. Private, Company D, 1st Iowa Infantry. At Wilsons Creek, Mo. Voluntarily left the line of battle, and, exposing himself to imminent danger from a heavy fire of the enemy, assisted in capturing a riderless horse at large between the lines and hitching him to a disabled gun, saved the gun from capture.

Corporal, Company F, 25th Massachusetts Infantry. Rescued his lieutenant, who was Iying between the lines mortally wounded; this under a heavy fire of the enemy. Private, Company E, 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry. At Stone River, Tenn. Seaman and Gun Captain, U. Served as captain of a gun on board the U. Varuna during an attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip and while under fire and ramming by the rebel ship Morgan, 24 April During this action at extremely close range while his ship was under furious fire and was twice rammed by the rebel ship Morgan, Bourne remained steadfast at his gun and was instrumental in inflicting damage on the enemy until the Varuna, badly damaged and forced to beach, was finally sunk.

Brought off from the picket line, under heavy fire, a comrade who had been shot through both legs. Entered service at Hampshire, Kane County, Ill. Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher 13 to 15 January Despite severe wounds sustained during the action Bowman displayed outstanding courage in the performance of duty as his ship maintained its well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns.

During this battle the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels. Captain, Company D, 27th Indiana Infantry.

Capture of flag of the 38th Alabama Infantry C. Lieutenant Colonel, 35th Ohio Infantry. Led his regiment in the face of a severe fire of the enemy; was severely wounded. Varuna in one of the most responsible positions, during the attacks on Forts Jackson and St.

Philip, and while in action against the rebel ship Morgan, 24 April Although guns were raking the decks from behind him, Bradley remained steadfast at the wheel throughout the thickest of the fight, continuing at his station and rendering service with the greatest courage until his ship, repeatedly holed and twice rammed by the rebel ship Morgan, was beached and sunk.

Carrying out his duties through the thick of battle and acting as captain of a 9-inch gun, Bradley consistently showed, "Attention to duty, bravery, and coolness in action against the enemy. Volunteered in response to a call and alone, in the face of a heavy fire of musketry and canister, went and procured ammunition for the use of his comrades. Private, Company C, 17th Michigan Infantry. While color bearer of his regiment, having been twice wounded and the sight of one eye destroyed, still held to the colors until ordered to the rear by his regimental commander.

Volunteered on a dangerous service and brought in valuable information. Capture of battle flag of 46th North Carolina C. Sergeant, Company K, 8th Iowa Infantry. Richmond in the action at Mobile Bay, 5 August , where he was recommended for coolness and good conduct as a gun captain during that engagement which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the destruction of Fort Morgan.

Brazell served gallantly throughout the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, batteries below Vicksburg, and was present at the surrender of New Orleans while on board the U. Commodore Perry in the attack upon Franklin, Va.

With enemy fire raking the deck of his ship and blockades thwarting her progress, Breen remained at his post and performed his duties with skill and courage as the Commodore Perry fought a gallant battle to silence many rebel batteries as she steamed down the Blackwater River. Mississippi during attacks on Forts Jackson and St.

Philip and during the taking of New Orleans, April Taking part in the actions which resulted in the damaging of the Mississippi and several casualties on it, Brennan showed skill and courage throughout the entire engagements which resulted in the taking of St. Philip and Jackson and in the surrender of New Orleans.

Private, Company D, 57th Pennsylvania Infantry. At Appomattox campaign, Va. Capture of engineer flag, Army of Northern Virginia. Sergeant, Company I, 90th Pennsylvania Infantry. At Rappahannock Station, Va. Voluntarily, and at great personal risk, picked up an unexploded shell and threw it away, thus doubtless saving the life of a comrade whose arm had been taken off by the same shell.

Capture of battle nag. Charged the enemy and assisted Sergeant. Norton in capturing a fieldpiece and 2 prisoners. Mississippi during her abandonment and firing in the engagement at Port Hudson, 14 March After asking to be assigned some duty, he was finally ordered to save himself and to leave the Mississippi which had been deliberately fired to prevent her falling into rebel hands. At White Oak Swamp, Va. At Malvern Hill, Va. Continued to fight after being severely wounded. First Sergeant, Company D, 5th U.

Rescued a wounded comrade who lay exposed to the enemy's fire, receiving a severe wound in the effort. Captain, Company K, th Indiana Infantry. To encourage his men whom he had ordered to lie down while under severe fire, and who were partially protected by slight earthworks, himself refused to lie down, but walked along the top of the works until he fell severely wounded.

Sergeant, Company C, 50th Pennsylvania Infantry. Capture of flag of 47th Virginia Infantry C. At Fredericksburg and Salem Heights, Va. Severely wounded while carrying the colors, he continued at his post, under fire, until ordered to the rear. Voluntarily and under a heavy fire from the enemy, 3 times crossed the field of battle with a load of ammunition in a blanket on his back, thus supplying the Federal forces, whose ammunition had nearly all been expended, and enabling them to hold their position until reinforcement arrived, when the enemy were driven from their position.

After the steering wheel and wheel ropes had been shot away by rebel fire, Brown stood on the gun platform of the quarterdeck, exposing himself to a close fire of musketry from the shore, and rendered invaluable assistance by his expert management of the relieving tackles in extricating the vessel from a perilous position, and thereby aided in the capture of Fort De Russy's heavyworks.

Captain, Company K, th Pennsylvania Infantry. With selected volunteers, assaulted and captured the works of the enemy, together with a number of officers and men.

Captain of the Forecastle, U. Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Brown fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Voluntarily carried a verbal message from Col. Hugh Ewing through a terrific fire and in plain view of the enemy. Captain, Company D, 12th Kentucky Infantry. August , Hammondsport, N. Richmond in action at Mobile Bay on 5 August Cool and courageous at his station throughout the prolonged action.

Brown rendered gallant service as his vessel trained her guns on Fort Morgan and on ships of the Confederacy despite extremely heavy return fire. He participated in the actions at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, with the Chalmette batteries, at the surrender of New Orleans and in the attacks on batteries below Vicksburg.

Private, Company A, 15th Ohio Infantry. Upon reaching the ridge through concentrated fire, he approached the color bearer of the 9th Mississippi Infantry C. Private, Company G, 30th Ohio Infantry. Despite the death of his captain at his side during the assault he continued carrying his log to the defense ditch. While he was laying his log in place he was shot down and thrown into the water.

Unmindful of his own wound he, despite the intense fire, dragged 5 of his comrades from the ditch, wherein they lay wounded, to a place of safety. Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay on 5 August Stationed in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells, Brown remained steadfast at his post and performed his duties in the powder division throughout the furious action which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

On board the flagship U. Hartford during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay on 5 August Knocked unconscious into the hold of the ship when an enemy shellburst fatally wounded a man on the ladder above him, Brown, upon regaining consciousness, promptly returned to the shell whip on the berth deck and zealously continued to perform his duties although 4 of the 6 men at this station had been either killed or wounded by the enemy's terrific fire.

First Civil War deed to merit Medal of Honor. Served as coxswain on board the U. Carrying out his duties with coolness and courage, Brownell served gallantly against the enemy as captain of a 9-inch gun in the attacks on Great Gulf and Vicksburg and as a member of the Battery Benton before Vicksburg.

Private, Company H, 5th Indiana Cavalry. At Walkers Ford, Tenn. Voluntarily passed through the enemy's lines under fire and conveyed to a battalion, then in a perilous position and liable to capture, information which enabled it to reach a point of safety.

Lieutenant, Company B, 34th U. At Ashepoo River, S. Voluntarily commanded a boat crew, which went to the rescue of a large number of Union soldiers on board the stranded steamer Boston, and with great gallantry succeeded in conveying them to shore, being exposed during the entire time to heavy fire from a Confederate battery.

Riga, Monroe County, N. Tacony during the taking of Plymouth, N. Carrying out his duties faithfully during the capture of Plymouth, Brutsche distinguished himself by a display of coolness when he participated in landing and spiking a 9-inch gun while under a devastating fire from enemy musketry. Sergeant, Company A, 46th Massachusetts Infantry. At New Bern, N. By his courage and judicious disposition of his guard of 16 men, stationed in a small earthwork at the head of the bridge, held in check and repulsed for a half hour a fierce attack of a strong force of the enemy, thus probably saving the city New Bern from capture.

Took position in advance of the skirmish line and drove the enemy's cannoneers from their guns; was mortally wounded. Corporal, Company A, 21st Connecticut Infantry. A;though wounded, refused to leave the field until the fight closed. Brooklyn in the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip and at the taking of New Orleans, 24 and 25 April Although severely wounded by a heavy splinter, Buck continued to perform his duty until positively ordered below.

Later stealing back to his post, he steered the ship for 8 hours despite his critical condition. His bravery was typical of the type which resulted in the taking of the Forts Jackson and St. Philip and in the capture of New Orleans. At Rowanty Creek, Va. Swam the partly frozen creek, under fire, in the attempt to capture a crossing. Sergeant, Company E, 19th Indiana Infantry. Though suffering from an open wound, carried the regimental colors until again wounded.

Capture of flag of 31st Mississippi C. Though himself wounded, gallantly fought his section of the battery under a fierce fire from the enemy until his ammunition was all expended, many of the cannoneers and most of the horses killed or wounded, and the enemy within 25 yards of the guns, when, disabling one piece, he brought off the other in safety. Sergeant, Company C, 6th Maryland Infantry. Was the first enlisted man of the 3d Division to mount the parapet of the enemy's line.

Private, Company H, 21st Ohio Infantry. Private, Company H, 54th Ohio Infantry. At Blackwater, near Franklin, Va. Gallantry in action while on detached service on board the gunboat Barney.

Private, Company H, 2d Minnesota Infantry. Was one of a detachment of 16 men who heroically defended a wagon train against the attack of cavalry, repulsed the attack and saved the train. Capture of flag, seizing it as his regiment advanced over the enemy's works. He received a bullet wound in the chest while capturing flag. Harrisburgh, Lewis County, N. At the risk of his own life went back while the rebels were still firing and, finding Col.

Wheelock unable to move, alone and unaided, carried him off the field of battle. First Sergeant, Company B, 2d U. At Shepherdstown Ford, Va. Date of issue 21 April Voluntarily attempted to spike a gun in the face of the enemy.

At Hanover Courthouse, Va. Capture of battle flag. At New Market, Va. Under a heavy fire of musketry, rallied a few men to the support of the colors, in danger of capture and bore them to a place of safety.

One of his comrades having been severely wounded in the effort, Sergeant. Burns went back a hundred yards m the face of the enemy's fire and carried the wounded man. Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August Although severely wounded and sent below under the surgeon's charge, Burns promptly returned to his station and assisted the powder division throughout the prolonged action which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of Fort Morgan.

Private, Company G, th Illinois Infantry. Voluntarily acted as a fireman on a steam tug which ran the blockade and passed the batteries under a heavy fire. Wabash in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January Advancing gallantly through the severe enemy fire while armed only with a revolver and cutlass which made it impossible to return the fire at that range, Burton succeeded in reaching the angle of the fort and going on, to be one of the few who entered the fort.

When the rest of the body of men to his rear were forced to retreat under a devastating fire, he was forced to withdraw through lack of support, and to seek the shelter of one of the mounds near the stockade from which point he succeeded in regaining the safety of his ship.

At Gaines Mill, Va. Seized the colors of the 83d Pennsylvania Volunteers at a critical moment and, under a galling fire of the enemy, encouraged the depleted ranks to renewed exertion. At Salem Heights, Va. Took command of the skirmish line and covered the movement of his regiment out of a precarious position. Signal engaged a large force of enemy field batteries and sharpshooters, returning their fire until the ship was totally disabled, at which time the white flag was raised.

Although entered on the sick list, Butts courageously carried out his duties during the entire engagement. Carrying out his duties through the thick of battle and acting as captain of a 9-inch gun, Brynes consistently showed "Attention to duty, bravery, and coolness in action against the enemy. Corporal, Company H, 1st Maryland Infantry. Gallantly planted the colors on the enemy's works in advance of the arrival of his regiment. At Alabama Bayou, La. Swam the bayou under fire of the enemy and captured and brought off a boat by means of which the command crossed and routed the enemy.

Sergeant, Company H, 13th Pennsylvania Cavalry. At Hatchers Run, Va. In a mounted charge, dashed into center of the enemy's line and captured the colors of the 33rd North Carolina Infantry.

First Sergeant, Company M. Capture of flag of 18th Virginia Infantry C. Private, Company B, d Illinois Infantry. At Fort Blakely, Ala. While his command was retreating before superior numbers at Woodstock, Va. At Amelia Courthouse captured 2 battle flags. Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December ; and 13 to 15 January Despite heavy return fire by the enemy and the explosion of the pounder Parrott rifle which killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, Campbell, as captain of a gun, performed his duties with skill and courage during the first 2 days of battle.

As his ship again took position on the line of the 13th, he remained steadfast as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns.

Private, Company I, 30th Ohio Infantry. Major, 1st West Virginia Cavalry. At Monterey Mountain, Pa. While commanding the regiment, charged down the mountain side at midnight, in a heavy rain, upon the enemy's fleeing wagon train. Many wagons were captured and destroyed and many prisoners taken. Colonel, 1st West Virginia Cavalry. At Greenbrier River, W. Saved, under fire, the life of a drowning soldier.

Sergeant, Company G, 8th Illinois Cavalry. At Chickahominy and Ashland, Va. Captured the flag of the 7th Virginia Infantry C. At Appomattox Courthouse, Va. Daring bravery and urging the men forward in a charge.

Saved a gun of his battery under heavy musketry fire, most of the horses being killed and the drivers wounded. Capture of flag and several prisoners. Corporal, Company A, 48th Ohio Infantry. Saved his regimental flag; also seized and threw a shell, with burning fuse, from among his comrades. At Fort Wagner, S. When the color sergeant was shot down, this soldier grasped the flag, led the way to the parapet, and planted the colors thereon. When the troops fell back he brought off the flag, under a fierce fire in which he was twice severely wounded.

Colonel, 3d Illinois Cavalry. Hamburg, Erie County, N. Directed the deployment of his command and held his ground, under a brisk fire of shot and shell in which he was several times wounded. Corporal, Company D, th Ohio Infantry. Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Carr performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the successful attacks carried out on Fort Morgan.

Musician, Company E, 1st Battalion, 15th U. At a critical stage in the battle when the 14th Corps lines were wavering and in disorder he on his own initiative bugled "to the colors" amid the 18th U.

Infantry who formed by him, and held the enemy. Within a few minutes he repeated his action amid the wavering 2d Ohio Infantry. This bugling deceived the enemy who believed reinforcements had arrived.

Thus, they delayed their attack. Capture of flag of 19th Georgia Infantry C. While in command of a detached company, seeing his regiment thrown into confusion by a charge of the enemy, without orders made a countercharge upon the attacking column and checked the assault. Penetrated within the enemy's lines at night and obtained valuable information. Captain, Company D, 3d Maryland Infantry. At Fort Stedman, Va. Captured the colors of the 51st Virginia Infantry C. During the battle he was captured and escaped bringing a number of prisoners with him.

Was one of four soldiers who volunteered to determine the position of the enemy at South Mountain, Md. While so engaged was fired upon and his three companions killed, but he escaped and rejoined his command in safety. Private, Company C, 25th Massachusetts Infantry. Two color bearers having been shot dead one after the other, the last one far in advance of his regiment and close to the enemy's line, this soldier rushed forward, and, under a galling fire, after removing the dead body of the bearer therefrom, secured the flag and returned with it to the Union lines.

Private, Company C, 20th Ohio Infantry. Voluntarily served as one of the crew of a transport that passed the forts under a heavy fire. Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August Displaying great coolness and exemplary behavior as first sponger of a gun, Cassidy, by his coolness under fire, received the applause of his officers and the guncrew throughout the action which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in the destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

In a heroic effort to rally the disorganized troops was disabled by a severe wound. While being carried from the field he recovered somewhat and bravely started to return to his command, when he received a second wound, which necessitated amputation of his right leg. Sergeant, Company A, 14th U. Commanded the regiment, all the officers being disabled. Colonel, 20th Maine Infantry.

Daring heroism and great tenacity in holding his position on the Little Round Top against repeated assaults, and carrying the advance position on the Great Round Top. While exposed to a galling fire, went in search of another regiment, found its location, procured ammunition from the men thereof, and returned with the ammunition to his own company. Private, Company F, th Pennsylvania Infantry. Capture of colors of 1st Virginia Infantry C.

Sergeant, Company E, 59th Massachusetts Infantry. Though seriously wounded in a bayonet charge and directed to go to the rear he declined to do so, but remained with his regiment and helped to carry the breastworks.

Cool and courageous although he had just come off the sick list, Chandler rendered gallant service throughout the prolonged action as his ship maintained accurate fire against Fort Morgan and ships of the Confederacy despite extremely heavy return fire. At Amelia Springs, Va. Granby, Oswego County, N. Under severe fire of the enemy and of the troops in retreat, went between the lines to the assistance of a wounded and helpless comrade, and rescued him from death or capture.

Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the rebel ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August Severely wounded, Chaput remained at his gun until relieved, reported to the surgeon and returned to his gun until the action was over. He was then carried below following the action which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Private, 5th Battery, Maine Light Artillery. Nearly all the officers and men of the battery having been killed or wounded, this soldier with a comrade continued to fire his gun after the guns had ceased.

The piece was then dragged off by the two, the horses having been shot, and its capture by the enemy was prevented. Was wounded and taken to the rear insensible, but when partially recovered insisted on returning to the battery and resumed command of his piece, so remaining until the close of the battle.

Private, Company I, 83d Indiana Infantry. At Hawes Shops, Va. While acting as aide, voluntarily led a part of the line into the fight, and was twice wounded. When the fire of the enemy's batteries compelled the men of his detachment for a short time to seek shelter, he stood manfully at his post and for some minutes worked his gun alone. Captain, Company C, 2d Minnesota Infantry. Seized the colors of a retreating regiment and led it into the thick of the attack. At Vaughn Road, Va.

Shot the Confederate Gen. Dunovant dead during a charge, thus confusing the enemy and greatly aiding in his repulse. Capture of battle flag of the 8th Florida Infantry C.

Lieutenant and Adjutant, 6th Maine Infantry. At Brooks Ford, Va. Having voluntarily taken command of his regiment in the absence of its commander, at great personal risk and with remarkable presence of mind and fertility of resource led the command down an exceedingly precipitous embankment to the Rappahannock River and by his gallantry, coolness, and good judgment in the face of the enemy saved the command from capture or destruction.

Seized the colors and advanced with them after the color bearer had been shot. Private, Company F, 88th Pennsylvania Infantry. Distinguished bravery in action; was severely wounded. Defended the division train against a vastly superior force of the enemy; he was severely wounded, but remained in the saddle for 20 hours afterward until he had brought his train through in safety. Corporal, Company H, 2d Minnesota Infantry. Captain, Company F, 2d Vermont Infantry. Distinguished conduct in a desperate hand-to-hand fight while commanding the regiment.

First lieutenant, Company H, 61st Pennsylvania Infantry. Although severely wounded, he led the regiment against the enemy, under a terrific fire, and saved a battery from capture. Captain, Company K, 58th Pennsylvania Infantry. Led his regiment in the charge, carrying the colors of another regiment, and when severely wounded in the right arm, incurring loss of same, he shifted the colors to the left hand, which also became disabled by a gunshot wound. Voluntarily took and carried the colors into action after the color bearer had been shot.

Participating in a strategic plan to destroy an enemy schooner, Clifford aided in the portage of a dinghy across the narrow neck of land separating the sea from the sound. Launching the boat in the sound, the crew approached the enemy from the rear and Clifford gallantly crept into the rebel camp and counted the men who outnumbered his party 3 to 1.

Returning to his men, he ordered a charge in which the enemy was routed, leaving behind a schooner and a quantity of supplies. Private, Company F, 71st Pennsylvania Infantry. Capture of flag of 9th Virginia Infantry C. Corporal, Company I, 14th Michigan Infantry. In a charge, captured the flag of the 40th North Carolina C.

Sergeant, Company H, 7th Wisconsin Infantry. Unsurpassed courage in battle, where he had both eyes shot out. While acting as aide-de-camp to a general officer, he 3 times asked permission to join his regiment in a proposed charge upon the enemy, and in response to the last request, having obtained such permission, joined his regiment and fought bravely at its head throughout the action. Major, th New York Infantry.

Seized the regimental colors at a critical moment and by a prompt advance on the enemy caused the entire brigade to follow him; and, after being himself severely wounded, he caused himself to be lifted into the saddle and a second time rallied the line in an attempt to check the enemy.

Sergeant, Company K, 4th Vermont Infantry. At Banks Ford, Va. Single-handedly captured 2 officers and 5 privates of the 8th Louisiana Regiment C. Sergeant Major, 6th New Hampshire Infantry. During Battle of the Wilderness rallied and formed, under heavy fire, disorganized and fleeing troops of different regiments. Commodore Hull at the capture of Plymouth, 31 October Painfully wounded by a shell which killed the man at his side, Colbert, as captain of the forward pivot gun, remained at his post until the end of the action, braving the heavy enemy fire and appearing as cool as if at mere target practice.

Sergeant, Company G, 97th Illinois Infantry. Corporal, Company I, 5th Michigan Cavalry. Capture of flag, during which he was wounded in the leg. Corporal, Company A, 1st Tennessee Cavalry. At Richland Creek, Tenn. Capture of flag of Chalmer's Division C. Liberty, Sullivan County, N. Captured a regimental flag of the enemy. Colonel, th Pennsylvania Infantry. Gallantly led his regiment in battle at a critical moment.

Major, 8th New York Cavalry. Capture of flag belonging to Gen. Private, Company C, 83d Indiana Infantry. Took command of the company in action, the captain having been wounded, the other commissioned officers being absent, and handled it with skill and bravery. Conlan served on board the U. Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 December Corporal, Company I, th Pennsylvania Infantry. The flag of his regiment having been abandoned during retreat, he voluntarily returned with a single companion under a heavy fire and secured and brought off the flag, his companion being killed.

Minnesota, in action during the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Connor charged up to the palisades and, when more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, risked his life to remain with a wounded officer.

With the enemy concentrating his fire on the group, he waited until after dark before assisting in carrying the wounded man from the field. Howquah on the occasion of the destruction of the blockade runner Lynx, off Wilmington, 25 September Performing his duty faithfully under the most trying circumstances, Connor stood firmly at his post in the midst of a crossfire from the rebel shore batteries and our own vessels.

At Fishers Hill, Va. Bugler, Battery B, 4th U. Volunteered at the age of 15 years to act as a cannoneer, and as such volunteer served a gun under a terrific fire of the enemy. Sergeant, Company A, th Illinois Infantry. At Pleasant Hill, La. During an attack by the enemy, voluntarily left the brigade quartermaster, with whom he had been detailed as a clerk, rejoined his command, and, acting as first lieutenant, led the line farther toward the charging enemy.

Voluntarily served as an aide on the staff of Col. David Hunter and participated in the battle, his term of service having expired on the previous day. Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Cooper fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Served as quartermaster on Acting Rear Admiral Thatcher's staff. During the terrific fire at Mobile, on 26 April , at the risk of being blown to pieces by exploding shells, Cooper advanced through the burning locality, rescued a wounded man from certain death, and bore him on his back to a place of safety.

Seized the regimental colors, the color bearer having been shot down, and, waving them, rallied the regiment under a heavy fire. Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking.

Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati, amidst an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last, though so penetrated by shellfire that her fate was sealed.

Serving bravely during this action, Corcoran was conspicuously cool under the fire of the enemy, never ceasing to fight until this proud ship went down, "her colors nailed to the mast. Captain, Company C, 5th Connecticut Infantry. At Cedar Mountain, Va. Seized a fallen flag of the regiment, the color bearer having been killed, carried it forward in the face of a severe fire, and though himself shot down and permanently disabled, planted the staff in the earth and kept the flag flying.

At South Side Railroad, Va. Raised the fallen colors and, rushing forward in advance of the troops, placed them on the enemy's works. Near Bristoe Station, Va. With one companion returned in the face of the enemy's heavy artillery fire and removed to a place of safety a severely wounded soldier who had been left behind as the regiment fell back.

Private, Company L, 4th Iowa Cavalry. Wapello, Louisa County, Iowa. Capture of flag in a personal encounter with its bearer. Private, Company F, 40th Massachusetts Infantry. At Drurys Bluff, Va. Individually demanded and received the surrender of 7 armed Confederates concealed in a cellar, disarming and marching them in as prisoners of war.

Cotton served on board the U. Proceeding under orders up the Yazoo River, the Baron De Kalb, with the object of capturing or destroying the enemy's transports, came upon the steamers John Walsh, R.

Locklan, Golden Age and the Scotland, sunk on a bar where they were ordered to be burned. Continuing up the river, the Baron De Kalb was fired upon but, upon returning the fire, caused the enemy's retreat. Returning down the Yazoo, she destroyed and captured large quantities of enemy equipment and several prisoners.

Serving bravely throughout this action, Cotton, as coxswain "distinguished himself in the various actions. Lieutenant Colonel, 10th New Hampshire Infantry. At Swifts Creek, Va. During a sudden night attack upon Burnham's Brigade, resulting in much confusion, this officer, without waiting for orders, led his regiment forward and interposed a line of battle between the advancing enemy and Hunt's Battery, repulsing the attack and saving the guns. Corporal, Company K, 55th Illinois Infantry.

Bravely defended the colors planted on the outward parapet of Fort Hill. Capture of a flag after a severe hand-to-hand contest; was mentioned in orders for his gallantry.

One of a party of 4 who voluntarily brought in a wounded Confederate officer from within the enemy's line in the face of a constant fire. Wyalusing, Crawford volunteered 25 May , in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in the Roanoke River. Taking part in a plan to explode the rebel ram Albemarle, Crawford executed his part in the plan with perfection, but upon being discovered, was forced to abandon the plan and retire leaving no trace of the evidence.

After spending two hazardous days and nights without food, he gained the safety of a friendly ship and was then transferred back to the Wyalusing. Though the plan failed his skill and courage in preventing detection were an example of unfailing devotion to duty. Private, Company D, 23d Illinois Infantry.

As captain of a gun on board the U. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Cripps fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan. Captain, Company F, 2d Massachusetts Cavalry. Voluntarily led a charge, which resulted in the capture of 14 prisoners and in which he himself was wounded.

Private, Company M, 6th Michigan Cavalry. Capture of flag of 18th Georgia C. Private, 12th Battery, Wisconsin Light Artillery. Took the place of a gunner who had been shot down and inspired his comrades by his bravery and effective gunnery, which contributed largely to the defeat of the enemy.

Cool and vigilant at his station throughout the prolonged action, Cronin watched for signals and skillfully steered the ship as she trained her guns on Fort Morgan and on ships of the Confederacy despite extremely heavy return fire. Philip, with the Chalmette batteries, at the surrender of New Orleans, and in the attacks on batteries below Vicksburg.

Severely wounded and ambushed by the enemy, he stripped the colors from the staff and brought them back into the line. At Blackburns Ford, Va.

With a companion, refused to retreat when the part of the regiment to which he was attached was driven back in disorder, but remained upon the skirmish line for some time thereafter, firing upon the enemy. At Bristoe Station, Va. Capture of flag of 22d or 28th North Carolina C. Sergeant Major, 26th New Jersey Infantry. Rendered great assistance in the heat of the action in rescuing a part of the field batteries from an extremely dangerous and exposed position.

Private, Company D, 91st Ohio Infantry. Capture of battle flag of 12th Virginia Infantry C. Private, Company D, 8th Missouri Infantry. Bloomington, McLean County, Ill. Assistant Surgeon, 33d New York Infantry. Voluntarily exposed himself to great danger by going to the fighting line there succoring the wounded and helpless and conducting them to the field hospital. Sergeant Major, 9th Connecticut Infantry. At Baton Rouge, La. Voluntarily sought the line of battle and alone and unaided captured 2 prisoners, driving them before him to regimental headquarters at the point of the bayonet.

Seized the colors of his regiment after 2 color bearers had fallen, bore them gallantly, and was among the first to gain a foothold, with his flag, inside the enemy's works. The first man to pass through the stockade, he personally led each assault on the traverses and was 4 times wounded. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:. First Lieutenant Alonzo H.

Cushing distinguished himself by acts of bravery above and beyond the call of duty while serving as an Artillery Commander in Battery A, 4th U. Using field glasses, First Lieutenant Cushing directed fire for his own artillery battery. He refused to leave the battlefield after being struck in the shoulder by a shell fragment. As he continued to direct fire, he was struck again, this time suffering grievous damage to his abdomen.

Still refusing to abandon his command, he boldly stood tall in the face of Major General George E. Pickett's charge and continued to direct devastating fire into oncoming forces. As the Confederate Forces closed in, First Lieutenant Cushing was struck in the mouth by an enemy bullet and fell dead beside his gun. His gallant stand and fearless leadership inflicted severe casualties upon Confederate Forces and opened wide gaps in their lines, directly impacting the Union Forces' ability to repel Pickett's Charge.

First Lieutenant Cushing's extraordinary heroism and selflessness above and beyond the call of duty, at the cost of his own life, are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, Battery A, 4th U. For more information on First Lieutenant Alonzo H. At Namozine Church, Va. Capture of flag on 10 May At Sailor Creek , Va, April Custer leaped his horse over the enemy's works and captured 2 stands of colors. Major, 20th Michigan Infantry.

At Horseshoe Bend, Ky. Distinguished gallantry in leading his regiment in a charge on a house occupied by the enemy. At Wilderness; Spotsylvania; Petersburg, Va. Sergeant, Company F, th Illinois Infantry. Concord, Morgan County, Ill. Saved the life of a captain. Sergeant, Company A, 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry.

At Paines Crossroads, Va. Assistant Surgeon, 47th Ohio Infantry. Voluntarily attempted to run the enemy's batteries. First Lieutenant, Company H, 30th U. At the mine, Petersburg, Va. One of the first to enter the enemy's works, where, after his colonel, major, and one-third the company officers had fallen, he gallantly assisted in rallying and saving the remnant of the command.

Major, 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Led one of the most desperate and successful charges of the war. Sergeant, Company B, 80th Ohio Infantry. This soldier, while his regiment was falling back, seeing the 2 color bearers shot down, under a severe fire and at imminent peril recovered both the flags and saved them from capture. While in command of a small force, held the approaches to the 2 bridges against repeated assaults of superior numbers, thereby materially delaying Early's advance on Washington.

Private, Company G, 46th Ohio Infantry. Capture of flag of 30th Louisiana Infantry C. Valley City during action against rebel fort batteries and ships off Elizabeth City, N.

When a shell from the shore penetrated the side and passed through the magazine, exploding outside the screen on the berth deck, several powder division protecting bulkheads were torn to pieces and the forward part of the berth deck set on fire.

Showing great presence of mind, Davis courageously covered a barrel of powder with his own body and prevented an explosion, while at the same time passing powder to provide the division on the upper deck while under fierce enemy fire.

Capture of flag of Worrill Grays C. Corporal, Company C, th Ohio Infantry. Sergeant, Company H, th Illinois Infantry. A community mourns Norm, 'chill' resident bar cat. Touching obituary about woman who died from opioid overdose goes viral. By National Desk Staff. Officers rescue 2-week-old puppy that got head stuck in gate.

Roofs ripped apart, neighborhoods submerged and flying debris. Devastating photos from Hawaii's volcanic eruption.

What produce has the most pesticide problems? Worker drives miles to surprise dying man with his favorite pizza. Mom and dad arrested for riding moped with 5-month-old between them.

Viral post warns mushrooms in yards can kill pets, but is it true? Jordan Blum, Houston Chronicle. Man fatally stabbed mom in head for not preparing food, police say. By Chelsea Robinson and Annie Vainshtein.

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